When former smokers have the opportunity to tell their stories about how tobacco has led to devastating consequences in their lives, it can be a powerful way to impact the lives of others.

APPEAL is proud to announce our recent partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Together, we are conducting a national search to identify candidates who are willing to share their compelling tobacco-related stories in an upcoming national tobacco education campaign, Tips From Former Smokers (Tips).  For the next campaign, APPEAL is focused on boosting recruitment of Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander candidates to insure that our heavily impacted communities are represented in cessation outreach.

Similar to previous campaigns seen here, real people who have had life-changing, smoking-related health issues will be featured. CDC is requesting our assistance in identifying individuals who fit its recruitment criteria and who may be interested in participating in the Tips campaign. For the 2016 Tips campaign, CDC is looking for stories from former smokers who:

  • Have or have had anxiety OR depression (not both) and a serious health condition due to smoking (ages 30–60)
  • Have been diagnosed with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) due to smoking (ages 40–55)
  • Currently serve or have served in the military and have been diagnosed with a serious health condition due to smoking (i.e., coronary artery disease/heart attack, COPD, peripheral artery disease, cancer, or stroke) (ages 30–60)
  • Have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis while smoking (ages 25–60)
  • Have used electronic cigarettes along with tobacco cigarettes instead of quitting because they thought it was better for their health than smoking cigarettes alone and yet they experienced a severe health problem (ages 20–60)
  • Have been diagnosed with a serious health condition caused by smoking and now have a compelling positive story about the benefits experienced since quitting (ages 18–54)

Visit www.joinCDCtips.com for more information. Please share any referrals you might have with APPEAL’s Joann Lee at [email protected], or contact Mimi Webb Miller Casting by e-mail ([email protected]) or by phone (toll free) (844) 274-9816.

 

Dr. Howard Koh Departs HHS After 5 Years of Important Work Tackling AANHPI Health Disparities

Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy &Leadership (APPEAL) recognizes the tireless work and tremendous impact of Dr. Howard Koh as he departs his post as Assistant Secretary for Health at the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS).

“We will always be indebted to Dr. Koh for his efforts to curb tobacco use in our communities,” said Rod Lew, executive director of the Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy & Leadership(APPEAL). “He has been one of our greatest champions for the past 20 years in the fight for a tobacco-free society.”

Across an impressive spectrum of roles from primary-care physician to academic researcher to his tenure as a diligent public servant, Dr. Koh has demonstrated a deep commitment to improving public health. APPEAL is particularly appreciative of Dr. Koh’s efforts as a strong ally in our efforts to curb the impacts of tobacco and cancer in underserved communities, including Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) communities.

His tireless work was behind the Obama administration’s efforts to accelerate progress against tobacco usage, including the first-ever, federal Tobacco Control Strategic Action Plan and the National Tobacco-Free College Campus Initiative, which promotes and supports tobacco-free policies at universities, colleges and other institutions of higher learning across the U.S. Dr. Koh has also been the driving force to ensure that the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid provide coverage for tobacco cessation.

“Dr. Koh’s efforts on addressing the tobacco epidemic are unmatched and he will be greatly missed at HHS,” Lew continued. “But, his work has paved the way to end tobacco use for the next generation and we look forward to continuing to work with him in the future.”

Dr. Koh will continue his remarkable career and his decades of work toward improving public health as Professor of the Practice of Public Health Leadership at Harvard University’s School of Public Health.

It is with a deep sense of gratitude that APPEAL joins the many communities touched by Dr. Koh in wishing him well in his new role.

Pathways of Change: Advancing Equity on Tobacco, Obesity & Cancer Control is a 2.5-day conference that celebrates APPEAL’s 20th anniversary by examining the health disparities faced by Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and other underserved communities and how to create meaningful change.  Early-bird rates are available until July 25.  Special discounted hotel room rates are also available.  For scholarship and other conference information, or to register, visit the Pathways of Change page.

Join APPEAL’s Efforts with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Tobacco Education Campaign

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the second round of their tobacco education campaign last week, Tips from Former Smokers (Tips). The campaign aims to continue raising awareness of the negative health effects caused by smoking, encourage smokers to quit, and encourage nonsmokers to protect themselves and their families from exposure to secondhand smoke through advertisements, public service announcments, and social media outreach. With a national spotlight on tobacco education, now is a critical time for APPEAL and our network members to help in delivering key information and resources to our Asian American Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the second round of their tobacco education campaign last week, Tips from Former Smokers (Tips). The campaign aims to continue raising awareness of the negative health effects caused by smoking, encourage smokers to quit, and encourage nonsmokers to protect themselves and their families from exposure to secondhand smoke through advertisements, public service announcments, and social media outreach. With a national spotlight on tobacco education, now is a critical time for APPEAL and our network members to help in delivering key information and resources to our Asian American Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities.

Building on the success of last year’s campaign, the CDC is incorporating new ads highlighting stories of individuals from diverse communities including: African American, Latino, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT), and Native American/Alaska Native communities. Additionally, CDC is making a special effort to reach out to Asian American smokers by placing ads that include a “tip” to encourage smokers to call the Asian Smokers’ Quitline in various Asian-language newspapers across the country.

To support these national tobacco education efforts, APPEAL encourages network members to help spread these critical messages to our communities and encourage them to get involved.

Here’s what you can do to help:

  • Share campaign materials with your clients, patients, or community members: Post the Tips videos and other relevant Tips information on your website or social media channels. Visit the Tips website.
  • Raise our communities’ voices in the fight against tobacco: Encourage community members to share personal stories on how tobacco has changed their life on the National Networks website.
  • Promote culturally appropriate resources for quitting tobacco: The Asian Smokers’ Quitline provides free in-language services to those who speak Chinese, Korean or Vietnamese.

    With the help of network members, APPEAL hopes to shed further light on how tobacco is impacting Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander communities. If you need assistance with your efforts, please contact us at [email protected]

Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL) commended CVS Caremark on Wednesday for prioritizing public health with its decision to remove all tobacco products from its 7,600 stores by Oct. 1.
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APPEAL guest edits peer reviewed articles on eliminating tobacco disparities among AAs & NHPIs

Oakland, C.A. – Today, Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL) and Health Promotion Practice(HPP) released the second ever (and first in over a decade) issue of a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to tobacco use in the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AA & NHPI) communities.

PRESS STATEMENT FOR IMMEDIATE DISTRIBUTION

Contact:
George C. Wu
(202) 306-0898
[email protected]

Rod Lew
Executive Director, APPEAL
(510) 318-7814
[email protected]

August 15, 2013

First Journal Issue Dedicated to AA & NHPI Tobacco Use Released in a Decade

Oakland, C.A. – Today, Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL) and Health Promotion Practice (HPP) released the second ever (and first in over a decade) issue of a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to tobacco use in the Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AA & NHPI) communities.

“APPEAL is pleased to be involved in both historic efforts to highlight the damage tobacco use has on our communities and the solutions that have been tested and proven successful,’’ said APPEAL Executive Director Rod Lew, who was a guest editor for the issue. “Tobacco use amongst AAs & NHPIs continues to remain high, and community members then suffer health consequences. That is why this issue of Health Promotion Practice is so important, and why we need to work together to advocate for the health of our communities.”

Promising Practices to Eliminate Tobacco Disparities Among Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities focuses on how these promising practices can lead to a tobacco free community norm and policy change. Tobacco use continues to be the single most preventable cause of death for all groups in the United States, including AAs & NHPIs. Men’s smoking rates among Pacific Islanders (35.7%) and Vietnamese (30.7%) are almost double those of all men in California, according to the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS). Rates are also high among Korean (21.5%) and Filipino men (18.7%).

At the release, former smoker Rico Foz talked about his struggle with tobacco use: “It took cancer to make me give up smoking. I was diagnosed with esophageal cancer and had surgery to remove the cancer, but because I was uninsured at the time, we had to use our family’s savings to pay for medical bills. I had a difficult recovery–barely able to walk or move–so my wife, a nurse, had to quit her job to care for me. Luckily, I recovered.”

Promising Practices to Eliminate Tobacco Disparities Among Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Communities will be available open access to the general public on September 1, 2013. Media can obtain an advance by contacting Elaine Colwell, [email protected] For more information about APPEAL’s strategies for tobacco control and eliminating tobacco-related disparities for AAs & NHPIs, please visit www.appealforcommunities.org.

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Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL) is a national organization working towards social justice and a tobacco-free Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) community. To learn more about APPEAL, please visit www.appealforcommunities.org.

Health Promotion Practice (HPP), an official journal of the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), publishes authoritative articles devoted to the practical application of health promotion and education. The journal provides information of strategic importance to a broad base of professionals engaged in the practice of developing, implementing, and evaluating health promotion and disease prevention programs.

300 Frank H. Ogawa Plaza, Suite 620 / Oakland, CA 94612 / P 510.272.9536 F 510.272.0817 / site by tumis.com

OAKLAND, May 23, 2013 – The Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO), in partnership with Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL), is encouraging Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (AA&NHOPI) tobacco users to speak with their physicians about smoking and quitting.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 23, 2013

Contact:
Stacy Lavilla
Director of Communications, AAPCHO
(510) 272-9536 x110
[email protected]

Rod Lew
Executive Director, APPEAL
(510) 318-7814
[email protected]

AAPCHO and APPEAL Urges AA&NHOPI Smokers to Speak with their Physicians

OAKLAND, May 23, 2013 – The Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO), in partnership with Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL), is encouraging Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (AA&NHOPI) tobacco users to speak with their physicians about smoking and quitting.

AAPCHO and APPEAL, in support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “Talk with Your Doctor” campaign, is asking physicians and patients, to engage in dialogue about smoking cessation. Yesterday, CDC unveiled its campaign, which recognizes the critical role health care providers can play in helping their patients quit.

“Smoking continues to be a serious problem in our communities,” said Jeffery Caballero, executive director of AAPCHO, “We need to continue to let people know, especially those who fall under the radar of mainstream programs, of the health risks involved with smoking, as well as the availability of resources and services to help people quit.”

AAPCHO, a national non-profit association of community health centers primarily serving medically underserved AA&NHOPIs, is also promoting the Asian Quitline, which offers interpretive services in Korean, Chinese, and Vietnamese. AAPCHO is asking physicians to refer smokers to the hotline, which is offering two weeks of free nicotine patches to callers.

“It is important to get trusted health care providers actively involved and encourage smokers to quit,” said Rod Lew, executive director of APPEAL. “And it is important that our communities, for which many are limited English proficient, get access to the in-language resources and assistance they need. We feel that the ‘Talk to Your Doctor Campaign,’ and the Asian Quitline helps us take steps toward that goal.”

National studies show extremely high smoking prevalence rates in Vietnamese and Korean American men – around one in three are smokers. Limited data on Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islander populations suggest that children begin smoking at a very early age, and that smoking prevalence is very high among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander men and women.

About AAPCHO
AAPCHO is a national association of 33 community health organizations dedicated to promoting advocacy, collaboration, and leadership that improves the health status and access of Asian Americans, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islanders in the U.S. For more information on AAPCHO please visit www.aapcho.org.

About APPEAL
Asian Pacific Partners for Empowerment, Advocacy and Leadership (APPEAL), founded in 1994, is a national organization working towards social justice and a tobacco-free Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander community. To learn more about APPEAL, please visit www.appealforcommunities.org

To share strategies that community-based organizations have used to engage diverse communities in tobacco control, on March 21, 2013 the APPEAL PROMISE Network hosted a webinar on promoting smoke-free multiunit housing policies with guest speakers Christine Araquel from the People’s Community Organization for Reform and Empowerment (People’s CORE) in Los Angeles, California and Ekta Prakash from CAPI USA in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

To share strategies that community-based organizations have used to engage diverse communities in tobacco control, on March 21, 2013 the APPEAL PROMISE Network hosted a webinar on promoting smoke-free multiunit housing policies with guest speakers Christine Araquel from the People’s Community Organization for Reform and Empowerment (People’s CORE) in Los Angeles, California and Ekta Prakash from CAPI USA in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ms. Araquel described People’s CORE’s Smoke-Free Apartments Project, which engaged residents in Asian American and Pacific Islander neighborhoods in Central Los Angeles in support of voluntary smoke-free policies in outdoor common areas at their apartment complexes. Ms. Prakash presented on CAPI’s Healthy Homes, Healthy Communities program and its work towards smoke-free policies in Minneapolis public housing, which has diverse residents including African and Asian immigrants and refugees.

Both speakers emphasized that a key step in working with diverse communities was extensive outreach at specific community-specific cultural events and settings, and listening to community concerns. Both People’s CORE and CAPI also included language access as an important part of their work with diverse communities; having staff who could speak Tagalog, Somali, and other appropriate languages and having in-language educational materials – were critical to each projects’ success.

If you were unable to attend the webinar and would like to learn more, the presentation slides are available on the APPEAL website at www.appealforcommunities.org/presentations.

In late February, APPEAL launched “Health Starts…Where We Live, Learn, Work, and Play,” a video contest and activity challenge for youth and young adults. The contest and activity challenge is part of our national effort to promote tobacco-free living, healthy eating, and active living (HEAL) in Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) communities.

In late February, APPEAL launched “Health Starts…Where We Live, Learn, Work, and Play,” a video contest and activity challenge for youth and young adults. The contest and activity challenge is part of our national effort to promote tobacco-free living, healthy eating, and active living (HEAL) in Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AA and NHPI) communities.

APPEAL invites all youth (13-17 years old) and young adults (18-24 years old) in the United States and the United States Associated Pacific Islands to submit original, imaginative and creative videos that inspire awareness on how availability of tobacco products, poor access to healthy foods and safe spaces for physical activity affect the ease of making healthy choices for AA and NHPI communities. APPEAL also challenges all youths and adults to make 2013 a year of action by pledging to raise awareness of these issues and organize activities to make changes in their schools, neighborhoods, and communities throughout the year.

“We hope the video contest provides a vehicle for youth to foster their storytelling skills in a medium that majority of their generation relate to in very powerful ways,” stated APPEAL Program Director and Interim Program Manager Rachel Matillano. “We encourage youth to become engaged civic participants and proactive agents of change within their communities who can imagine and pursue their own vision of a positive future.”

The deadline for submissions to the video contest goes through April 30, 2013 and winners will be announced on May 17, 2013. Two $250 cash prizes will be awarded – one to the best entry by a youth (13-17 years old), and the other to the best entry by a young adult (18-24 years old). Entries must follow the official rules which can be accessed by visiting this web link: www.appealforcommunities.org/videocontesthealthstarts.

APPEAL is pleased to welcome new staff to the team.

APPEAL is pleased to welcome new staff to the team. Lisa Fu is returning to APPEAL as Research Manager for our upcoming community-based participatory research project. Nina Kahori Fallenbaum joins APPEAL as Communications Manager, and will focus on Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL) and developing related policy initiatives. APPEAL also welcomes Mey S. Saephan to the team as an intern. We are excited by the energy and expertise that our new staff members will contribute to the team.